Best time to visit Brazil

While some of Brazil's attractions can be visited year-round, others are rather more seasonal, the movements of wildlife and people halted by heat or floods.
Brazil's summer is Dec-Mar, and winter Jun-Sep - but heat and humidity rise the further north you go. Overall, Sep-Oct is the best time to visit Brazil - avoiding major vacation periods, the chilly southern winter and soggy season in the Pantanal – as well as enjoying cheaper prices. Rio's samba schools are also starting Carnival rehearsals. The Amazon is sweltering year-round; the Jan-May floods just mean you’ll travel by canoe rather than on foot.

Rio de Janeiro Weather Chart

 
MIN °C
MAX °C
RAIN (mm)
JAN
21
30
203
FEB
21
30
186
MAR
21
29
183
APR
19
27
146
MAY
17
26
107
JUN
16
25
71
JUL
16
24
66
AUG
16
25
76
SEP
17
25
96
OCT
18
26
129
NOV
19
27
159
DEC
20
28
207

When to visit Brazil & when not to

December and January in Brazil are midway through the summer season with Christmas vacations and warm weather pushing up prices. Crowds and prices peak for the Rio carnival, which takes place in February or early March. It tends to be hotter the further north you are and cities like Manaus, in the Amazon, maintain a fairly consistent 30 degree high all year round whereas temperatures in São Paulo, for example, will start to dip as you move into April and May. The warmer months of the year are also the wettest with wildlife watching in regions such as the Pantanal pretty much out of the question due to access routes suffering as a result of excessive rain. Visiting the Amazon is going to be a hot and sticky experience whenever you visit; the rainy season here floods the forest which means you'll just be exploring in a boat rather than on foot. Conversely, Brazil's winter season, which starts in June, experiences the least amount of rainfall and the higher up and the further south you get the chillier temperatures become with several resorts shutting up shop, despite of the July winter break for schools and universities. August can be exceptionally busy thanks to the influx of visitors from the Northern Hemisphere however, once traditional European vacations are over, September and October are usually seen as the best months to visit Brazil, especially for jaguar spotting in the Pantanal. November finds temperatures and rain levels creeping up across the country. August is one of the best times to visit Brazil due to the comfortable temperatures and lack of rain.

Our top Brazil Vacation

Small group tour in Brazil

Small group tour in Brazil

An in depth discovery tour of Brazil including the Amazon

From US $5370 to US $5540 15 days ex flights
Small group travel:
2019: 14 Sep
2020: 25 Apr, 11 Jul, 12 Sep
Travel Team
If you'd like to chat about Brazil or need help finding a vacation to suit you we're very happy to help.

Best time to visit Brazil

Guy Marks, from our supplier Tribes Travel, shares his best time to see wildlife in Brazil:
“The Pantanal is seasonally flooded so there are islands of dry land where the wildlife concentrates. There’s only one road down there so in the very wet season it’s hard to access – it's certainly more difficult to see jaguars, you can’t drive anywhere, and you’ve got to travel by canoe. You can do horse rides – canters through deep water are fantastic – but you want to go in the dry season really, from July until October.
If you want to go to the Amazon it doesn’t really make much difference when you go; it’s the rainforest so it rains all year. There is high water and low water, but there are advantages to both. In low water you get more walks through the forest, and at high water (Jan-May) as much as ten metres of water rise through the forest – which means you’re ten metres higher into the canopy when you’re in a boat. So the animals that live in the canopy are not absolutely miles away – you can see them much closer!”

Festivals & events in Brazil

Carnival

(February or early March)
Carnival – the ‘Celebration of Life’ – is of course Brazil’s biggest annual event (unless the World Cup or Olympic Games are heading this way…) – but with high prices and heaving crowds, we suggest doing it with a twist. Salvador and Paraty also hold carnivals, complete with floats filled with costumed dancers, drummers and singers – but on a much more manageable scale, and with an atmospheric historical backdrop. Do be aware that you may get smothered in mud by revelers in Paraty though…
There are also many pre-carnival events so you can always enjoy the buildup in Rio before heading to a more tranquil spot once the party really kicks off.
Written by Vicki Brown
Photo credits: [Page banner: Tambako The Jaguar] [Rain: paulisson miura] [Toucan: Gerry Zambonini] [Carnival: nateClicks]
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